DB PLANNING COUNCIL

Indigenous Art, Music and Expression.

Two women volunteers wearing Crushing Colonialism t-shirts are seated at a welcome table at a Decolonized Beatz event in Winnipeg, Canada. A white table cover with a Crushing Colonialism logo drapes the table.

DECOLONIZED BEATZ
PLANNING COUNCIL

Crushing Colonialism and a working advisory council are planning programming that is created and led by 2LGBTQIA+ Indigenous partners and meets the access, cultural, and safety needs of all our relatives and non-Indigenous guests during World Pride 2025.

Crushing Colonialism is currently seeking Advisory Council members. If interested in serving the 2LGBTQIA+ communities, please send a letter of interest and resume or CV to info@crushingcolonialism.org with subject line: Interested in DBIWP Advisory Council.

MEET OUR
PLANNING COUNCIL

A picture of a smiling Indigenous person in a dark button-up collared shirt over a white tee leaning on a wall. Text on a white and yellow background reads: Crushing Colonialism; Meet the Team: Hāmiora Bailey. Hāmiora Bailey is a curator whose practice looks at metabolising intergenerational knowledge as a citational practice, and affirm mana-hononga-tangata (living relationship). As a multidisciplinary artist, Bailey’s methodologies straddle photography, videography, digital design & public art. As Kaiwhakahaere Takatāpui (First Nations Creative Director), Hāmiora founded Te Tīmatanga, New Zealand’s largest Takatāpui (First Nations LGBTQIA+) Festival. Instagram: @sam.bailey_

Hāmiora Bailey (Ngāti Porou Ki Harataunga, Ngāti Huarere) is a curator whose practice looks at metabolising intergenerational knowledge as a citational practice, and affirm mana-hononga-tangata (living relationship).

As a multidisciplinary artist, Bailey’s methodologies straddle photography, videography, digital design & public art. Recently, Bailey partnered with ColensoBBDO , Porta-Novelli, Hearts & Science and Whakamana to create Pīkari Mai! A digital art intervention to cut off the toff. Replacing “Royal” gossip with indigenous news. The plug has been seen over 5.5 million times globally.

As Kaiwhakahaere Takatāpui (First Nations Creative Director), Hāmiora founded Te Tīmatanga, New Zealand’s largest Takatāpui (First Nations LGBTQIA+) Festival.

Instagram @sam.bailey_

A picture of an Indigenous person with long dark hair, wearing a black jacket over a loose colorful button-up, looking head on at the camera. Text on a white and yellow background reads: Crushing Colonialism; Meet the Team: Aqqalu Berthelsen. Aqqalu Berthelsen, also known as Uyarakq, was born in Nuuk, Greenland in the mid 80s. They are a self taught music producer/composer and DJ with a background in metal music. They won a Greenlandic Koda Award in 2015 for his solo album Raatiu Nukik (2014) and got nominated for Nordic Councils Music Prize in 2016 for the collaborative work Kunngiitsuuffik (2015) alongside the Greenlandic rapper Peand-eL. Instagram: @uyarakq

Aqqalu Berthelsen, also known as Uyarakq, was born in Nuuk, Greenland in the mid 80s. They are a self-taught music producer/composer and DJ with a background in metal music.

Growing up between Uummannaq, Northern Greenland and Nuuk, the capital, has played a large role in shaping them to be a versatile musician between two worlds. They are currently doing a lot of work in the Indigenous circumpolar hip hop and rap scene within two continents, the North American arctic and the European arctic.

They won a Greenlandic Koda Award in 2015 for his solo album Raatiu Nukik (2014) and got nominated for Nordic Councils Music Prize in 2016 for the collaborative work Kunngiitsuuffik (2015) alongside the Greenlandic rapper Peand-eL.

They are currently based in Helsinki, Finland.

Instagram @uyarakq

A picture of a smiling Native person in glasses with face tattoos and a button-up collared shirt is on a yellow background. Text Reads: Crushing Colonialism; Meet the Team: Theo Jean Cuthand. Since 1995 he has been making short experimental videos and films about sexuality, madness, Queer identity and love, and gender and Indigeneity, which have screened in festivals internationally. He is of Plains Cree and Scots descent, a member of Little Pine First Nation, and currently resides in Toronto, Canada. website: tjcuthand.com; FB: /TJCuthandArtist; Instagram: @cabbagetownstomper

Theo Cuthand was born in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada in 1978, and grew up in Saskatoon. Since 1995 he has been making short experimental videos and films about sexuality, madness, Queer identity and love, and gender and Indigeneity, which have screened in festivals internationally. His work has also exhibited at galleries including the MOMA in NYC, The National Gallery in Ottawa, and The Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. He completed his BFA majoring in Film and Video at Emily Carr University of Art and Design in 2005, and his Masters of Arts in Media Production at Ryerson University in 2015. He has also written three feature screenplays and has performed at Live At The End Of The Century in Vancouver, Queer City Cinema’s Performatorium in Regina, and 7a*11d in Toronto. In 2017 he won the Hnatyshyn Foundation’s REVEAL Indigenous Art Award. He is a Whitney Biennial 2019 artist. He is of Plains Cree and Scots descent, a member of Little Pine First Nation, and currently resides in Toronto, Canada.

website: tjcuthand.com

Twitter: @tjcuthand

FB: /TJCuthandArtist

Instagram: @cabbagetownstomper

A picture of a singing Native person holding a mic in one hand with the other arm raised, wearing a loose silver and white long sleeve top open to the belly button and a matching headband, is on a yellow background. Text Reads: Crushing Colonialism; Meet the Team: Tony Enos. Hailed as “an example of possibility for people living with HIV,” by the Advocate Magazine, two-time Native American Music Award Nominee and Cherokee two-spirit musician Tony Enos celebrates 15 years as a singer/songwriter/producer/entertainer and activist. He fosters love, unity, and awareness in all that he does, empowering the resilience of the human spirit through the medicine of music. Website: www.tonyenosmusic.com; All Social Media: @tonyenos

Tony Enos Hailed as “an example of possibility for people living with HIV,” by the Advocate Magazine, two-time Native American Music Award Nominee and Cherokee two-spirit musician Tony Enos celebrates 15 years as a singer/songwriter/producer/entertainer and activist. The Kennedy Center performer and United States U=U ambassador continues to foster love, unity, and awareness in all that he does. Empowering the resilience of the human spirit through the medicine of music. 

Website: www.tonyenosmusic.com

All Social Media: @tonyenos 

A Halpulaar / Lokono person wearing black sunglasses kneeling wearing black and white Fulani chayah trousers, a black top, a black jean jacket & black boots looking up at the camera. Rivolta is wearing a cowrie shell embedded in silver jewelry set with long brown braids.

Rivolta Sata is a multidisciplinary Afro-Indigenous artist that utilizes a passion for rock & alternative music to host the online Youtube show “Pass The Mic” to highlight Indigenous artists from this genre. 

Rivolta Sata is also the event producer for the Afrotropicale concept as well as creative director/producer for African Guardians, a multimedia project highlighting Indigenous history of Afriqiyah.

Socials @RivoltaSata 

Crushing Colonialism tells the stories of Indigenous people to create a world that values and honors Indigeneity.

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